Blog

Share

Lace – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Lace is a fine, openwork fabric, typically created from cotton, line, silk or metallic threads to make net mesh patterned work. Lace dates back to the 15th century , when it was worn as a status symbol white edged cuffs and collars denoted your position in society. Today, it is a popular trim, particularly in lingerie and bridal wear.

lace 1 <img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-392" src="http://www.zimfn Find Out More.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LACETHE-300×170.jpg” alt=”LACETHE” width=”300″ height=”170″ srcset=”http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LACETHE-300×170.jpg 300w, http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LACETHE-600×340.jpg 600w, http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LACETHE-150×85.jpg 150w, http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LACETHE-500×283.jpg 500w, http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/LACETHE.jpg 632w” sizes=”(max-width: 300px) 100vw, 300px” />  LACEWE

Share

Knife Pleat – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Knife Pleats, or accordion pleats (like the musical instrument) allow the garment to expand and relax in shape when moving. They are most commonly found in skirts and are a series of narrow, equal pleats, which have been sharply creased so to lie in one direction.

knife pleat

Share

Kimonos – A to Z of Fashion

Share
Kimonos are loose-fitting, T-shaped robes that are part of the traditional national dress of Japan. They have wide sleeves, typically cut in one piece with the rest of the garment, and are full length, wrapping to close at the front.

kimono 4 kimono 3 kimono 2 Kimono 1

Share

Kick Pleats – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Kick Pleats are inverted pleats used at the base of a narrow skirt to give it a ‘kick’. They allow the wearer more freedom of movement. Kick pleats are often short pleats, leading up from the bottom hem, and are commonly found in the back of skirts or coats.

kick pleat 3 kick pleat 2 kick pleat 1

Share

Kangaroo Pockets – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Kangaroo Pockets are long, lengthwise pockets — a bit like a letterbox — that have two ‘pocket’ gaps for the hands at either end. They are often used on hoodies or in sportswear, and are named for resembling a Kangaroo’s pouch. (Although a real Kangaroo would actually pop her baby in from the top.)

kangakangarookangaroo pockrts

Share

Jouy Print – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Jouy Print

Definition: A white or off-white background on which a repeated pattern, depicting a detailed scene, appears.
Detail: Recent adopters of the design include Carven, which chose to depict a safari scene for its spring/summer 2013 collection.

jouy jouy jouy print fabricjouy print

Share

Jacquard – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Jacquard was an apparatus from the 19th century and is named after its inventor, Joseph-Marie Jacquard. It is attached to a loom and uses a punch-card system, which the loom reads like binary code — each card represents a line of the pattern and has holes that allow threads to pass through (or not), changing the colours and slowly creating the jacquard design. It allowed for more elaborate patterns to be produced in woven and knitted fabrics at greater quantities and speeds.

jazcquard loom jacq jac dressjac fabric

Share

Jabots – A to Z of Fashion

Share

Jabots are the frilled, decorative ruffles (often lace) that hang at the front of the shirt. They were the equivalent of a 17th century gentleman’s tie, when jabots were often made of lace or cambric, and sewn to both sides of the front opening of a man’s shirt. Later, they were secured at the neck with a band or a pin. Think Pirates of the Caribbean meets the Supreme Court — jabots are still part of judges’ and barristers’ ceremonial dress.

jabot collar jabot lace jabot channel <img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-321" src="http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/jabot-african-200×300 useful content.jpg” alt=”jabot african” width=”200″ height=”300″ />

Share
Share