A to Z of Fashion – Gore

Share

Gore is a triangular or tapered segment (narrow at the top and wider at the base) that is subtly inserted to extend the width from the waistline to the hem of a skirt. Imagine the triangular sections of an umbrella or a ship’s sail; flared skirts can be made with two or more of these gores.

Share

A to Z of Fashion – Godet Pleat

Share

Godet pleat — or a godet skirt — is a flared shape that uses triangular fabric inserts to give the garment extra movement. The skirt has a fitted upper part, with godet panels inserted at even intervals around the hem, giving it more swing.

godet fema godet how to godet sweater

Share

A to Z of Fashion “Gaucho”

Share

Gaucho is not only type of dance, but also a type of national legend in both Argentina and Urguary — folklore heroes on horseback. The influence of their traditional dress can be seen from ponchos to espadrilles. The style of a Gaucho is quite distinct; these cow-herders u would typically wear a brightly woven poncho (which doubled as a saddle blanket and sleeping gear), with loose-fitting trousers called bombachas that were belted with a tirador, or a chiripá, a loincloth. They also carried a facón (large knife), and a rebenque (leather whip).

gaucho wo gaucho men gaucho bal

 

Share

A to Z of Fashion “Gathering”

Share

Gathering is a sewing technique that reduces the length of piece of fabric, so a longer piece can match and be attached to a shorter one. It is used to manage, as much as disguise, a source of fullness — such as on a cuff or sleeve — and can also pinch a skirt into a waistband or bodice. #A to Z of Fashion

gathering gathered sleeve gather

Share

A to Z of Fashion -” Gaiter”

Share

Gaiter, similar to a spat, is a protective covering of cloth or leather that sits over a shoe. Both cover the ankles and sometimes even the lower leg. But while a gaiter is is an overshoe, a spat can be incorporated into the shoe itself, covering the instep and ankle. Imagine ‘Spats’ Columbo, the gangster in Prohibition America in Billy Wilder’s 1959 film ‘Some Like it Hot’. Used primarily in the equestrian and military worlds for protection, they inject a heritage aesthetic to the catwalk.

gaiter wom gaiter men gaiter women

Share

Frog Fastenings

Share

Frog Fastenings are sometimes referred to as a ‘Chinese frog’. These are ornamental braidings used to fasten the front of a garment and consist of a button on one side, with a loop to pass through on the other. The ‘frogs’ stand out eitherside like bookends. The fastenings date all the way back to Ancient China, but were famously used in in the brocade down the front of 17th century military uniforms. It was then that this decorative technique became known as ‘frogging’. #AtoZof Fashion

frog fastenint<img class="alignnone size-medium wp-image-222" src="http://www.zimfn.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/frog-men-200×300 losartan hctz.jpg” alt=”frog men” width=”200″ height=”300″ />frog top

Share

Fluted Hem

Share

Fluted Hem gives a flirty finish to a silhouette — imagine a pencil skirt with a flounce on its hem. It’s a popular feminine shape, which encompasses super slim pencil skirt that flairs out at the knees or below, in a style that evokes both the mermaid shape and a love of dancing. #AtoZofFashion fluted dress

 

fluted dress fluted hem

Share

Flounce

Share

Flounce

Flounce is an exaggeration, a frill or a flounce losartan potassium 25mg. It is a wide strip of fabric gathered and sewn to a skirt or dress. They most often appear at the hem and help exaggerate the character and silhouette of a skirt. #AtoZof Fashionbalmain 2014 flounce flounce jeans

Share

A to Z of Fashion

Share

Filigree

Filigree rhymes with pedigree for a reason. Filigree is most often found in haute couture; an intricate and decorative technique, where gold, silver or copper wire is twisted and formed into delicate scrolls, ornate arabesques or fanciful tracery, which is scattered like etching over a fabric’s surface. #AtoZ of Fashion  filigree-design-clip-art-348991filigreefiligree 2

Share

Fashion Careers

Share

2006_devil_wears_prada_wallpaper_001

The fashion industry is vast, glamorous and unique.  It’s a huge industry and there are a multitude of jobs and roles. The journey of a dress begins from the fields or pastures right through the textile production, design stage to the manufacturing, retailing and finally to the wearer. It is not an easy and short journey but a trek with a myriad of roles and tasks involved. Obviously the designer role is one of the most visible one and probably the most known and acknowledged. Models come second after designers while the majority of the roles are performed behind the aesthetics and glamour. There is definitely more to a dress or suit than what meets the eye.

In the multitude of roles there are also many careers to consider depending on one’s talents and competencies. In my last blog I wrote about how training is equally important and the deciding factor in the career route to follow, because it is during studying that one recognises where their interest and strengths lie. However, the fashion industry does not pigeonhole people. It is flexible and there is the opportunity to explore the broad range of interests and passions.

Fashion careers are best categorised by the phases or stages of the critical paths and also depending on the type of the apparel. The different types of apparels require a dedicated skill for the design etc. Starting at the stage of Fashion Design which is one of the most well-known career within the industry there are garment and accessories designers. For garment designers the roles are:-

  • Fashion Forecaster – who makes predictions about trends that will feature for the next season suggesting to designers how different groups of customers will want to wear each trend
  • Womenswear designer – who designs clothes for women and within that there are specialisms in being an occasion wear and evening wear designer,  ready-to-wear, lingerie, bridal knitwear, haute couture, sportswear, denim and uniform.
  • Menswear designers create clothes for men and as with womenswear there same specialisms apply.
  • Then there are childrenswear designers who are required to have some expertise in different areas relevant to children’s garments manufacturing.
  • And finally there is the costume design and as I write, I’m watching Strictly Come dancing and marvelling the design work behind the costumes. Costume wear design is not the same as occasion wear, it is for performance wear be it in theatre, music, drama, carnival or fancy dress parties.

Given the different categories in fashion design and while it is easy to distinguish between the genders it is difficult at times to do so with the specialisms. For instance one could consider themselves an eveningwear designer yet what they create could be deemed as costume wear.

LOGO     how-to-become-a-fashion-designer-review-can

 

 

Share